Dave Grohl Explains How He Designed His Throne While High

Dave Grohl's 'Game of Thrones' style rock throne was conceptualized while he was under some heavy chemical influence...

Johnny Firecloudby Johnny Firecloud

The music world has been a-buzz with tales of Dave Grohl and his broken leg, and while he’s been in need of a day off for quite some time now, the tireless man of a thousand projects managed to play their July 4th 20th anniversary blowout concert – at which he unveiled a completely badass, holy-shit-are-you-high? throne decked out with guitars, a speaker cabinet and more.

A Broken-Legged Dave Grohl Writes Open Letter to fans

Turns out that Dave actually was high when he designed the Game of Thrones-meets-Spinal Tap chair, as he explained at the show:

“So I took a couple oxys — don’t touch that shit — and I drew a picture and said, ‘You know what? If we’re gonna go out and do that Washington D.C. show…’,” he told Saturday’s crowd. “I was high as a fucking kite when I drew that picture. I said, ‘I’m not missing that show for the world. You build me that throne and we’ll place a Washington D.C. rock concert.'”

He even provided proof of his conceptual wizardry:

grohl use

Watch the full description below (starting at 5:20):

Pretty badass (& very rock n roll) silver lining on a broken-leg cloud, I’d say. But really though, don’t mess with oxy. Seriously, fucking don’t. It’s rare that a top-tier artist will refer to personal use of oxycontin, and while Grohl’s use and reference was undoubtedly for valid medical reasons – the dude’s playing a show while hobbled with a broken leg, no benefit out the doubt needed – it’s easy for less discerning fans to see this as a green light of endorsement.

It’s not. With a widespread proven track record, Xanax and Oxycodone/Oxycontin make junkies out of people who would never buy from a street dealer. And depending on where you live, the industry may be actively preying upon this fact: of all the oxycodone prescribed in America in the first half of 2010, 98% was dispensed in Florida. According to the state medical examiner’s office, an average of 7 Floridians die from prescription drug overdoses every day — more than from car accidents. 

On the explosion of “pill mills” in America, Medical Practice Insider notes that the public “demand and cost on the prescription painkiller front allows for pill mills to gestate — but it’s the legalities and underfunded digital resources that allow for them to thrive.”

“Certain legislation, like Tennessee’s Intractable Pain Treatment Act, has been accused of establishing a realm where pill mills can flourish,” the article continues. “Put into effect in 2001, the Tennessee measure was meant to make drugs, like the newly developed oxycodone, more accessible to patients with cancer and intractable pain. What the act ended up facilitating was an “explosion in use” of prescription painkillers in locales like Sullivan County (which saw 11 pain clinics emerge to meet the demand), according to District Attorney General Barry Staubus.”

The bottom line: Popping pills is dangerous, far more dangerous than a brand name and doctor’s approval suggest. Mixing alcohol exponentially increases the risk. Common sense would suggest that those in search of chemical escapism should use whatever natural means they can (such as cannabis) before resorting to pills, but a society built upon institutional authority and misinformation will consistently make the wrong choices – as we see in the rise of recreational Pfizer Culture. 

Not to dampen Dave’s parade – it’s simply important to illustrate that oxycontin is among the most dangerous narcotics a kid can get their hands on these days, and doing so isn’t that hard. Inform yourselves – chances are, oxy won’t have you building any thrones.