WWDC 15: Apple Music – Price, Release Date and the Android Debut of Apple’s Spotify Contender

Apple Music is going after Spotify's throne. Take notes, Tidal.

Paul Tamburroby Paul Tamburro

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Apple has revealed its Apple Music subscription service, with the company heading straight for the throne that Spotify currently occupies.

Apple Music, which is a complete relaunch of Beats Music after the tech giant acquired the headphone manufacturers, marks Apple’s first true foray into Spotify’s territory and will act as a combination of both streamed content and the user’s own music stored in the classic Music app.

Also See: WWDC 15: Apple Ensures “The Fappening” Won’t Happen Again with Two-Factor iCloud Authentication

The app, which was introduced by Beats co-founder Jimmy Iovine, also saw Drake take to the stage in order to sell it. Drake, who had been touted to soon pledge his allegiance to Jay-Z’s Tidal, has clearly seen the light and decided to follow Apple into the world of streaming, rather than jumping aboard the sinking ship along with Beyonce, Kanye West and co

Apple stated that it Apple Music had “tens of thousands” of music videos (remember those?) available ad free, along with “top songs, top albums and top videos.” It also showed off Taylor Swift’s ‘Bad Blood’ in a list of those top songs, meaning the pop star has probably sided with Apple after dramatically quitting Spotify due to its alleged mistreatment of artists.

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The Apple Music app also features Siri integration, allowing users to search for tracks, albums, artists and more, with an onstage demonstration showing that users can ask Siri to display the “top 10 songs in alternative,” before being redirected to a playlist containing those tracks.

Apple Music will be available from June 30th in over 100 countries with iOS 8.4, and will cost $9.99 a month (or $14.99 for up to six people as part of a neat ‘Family Plan’), with it being available for free for the first three months. Oh, and it’ll also be coming to Android. Weird, right?