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Windows 10 Won’t Be Releasing on July 29th for Everybody

The new operating system will receive a steady rollout rather than a global launch.

Paul Tamburroby Paul Tamburro

Though Windows 10 still carries the same July 29th release date, not everyone will get their hands on it at the end of the month.

According to Microsoft, the rollout of WIndows 10 will begin on its stated release date, though it will first be made available to those who have been helping Microsoft test the upcoming operating system as part of the Windows Insider program that began last October. 

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Those who will be making the jump to Windows 10 for free from Windows 7 and 8.1 have been asked to reserve their copy of the new OS, though it turns out that those reservations may not be filled on July 29th, with Microsoft’s executive vice president of Terry Myserson taking to a blog post to explain the plans for its rollout. He said: “Starting on July 29, we will start rolling out Windows 10 to our Windows Insiders. From there, we will start notifying reserved systems in waves, slowly scaling up after July 29th.”

He continued: “Each day of the rollout, we will listen, learn and update the experience for all Windows 10 users. If you reserved your copy of Windows 10, we will notify you once our compatibility work confirms you will have a great experience, and Windows 10 has been downloaded on your system.”

It’s uncertain how long this rollout is expected to last, though considering the launch day issues Microsoft has had with its operating systems in the past, a steady release of Windows 10 could be beneficial for the company, as it will mean that any glaring issues that are discovered by early adopters on July 29th will be ironed out before it receives its full public release.