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What Version of Windows 10 Will You Get When You Upgrade?

Microsoft is offering like-for-like upgrades for Windows 10.

Paul Tamburroby Paul Tamburro

Microsoft has announced that existing Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users will get like-for-like replacements of their existing operating system when they choose to make the free upgrade to Windows 10 later this year.

The full list of current Windows 7 and 8.1 editions and their Windows 10 equivalents have been listed on Microsoft’s official website, showing users what edition of Windows 10 will replace their current OS.

Also See: These are the Windows Features That Will No Longer Work When You Upgrade to Windows 10

The upgrade editions are as follows:

 

Windows 7

All editions must be running the latest version of Windows 7 (Service Pack 1) to receive the free upgrade to Windows 10 via Windows Update.

Windows 7 Starter: Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Home Basic: Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Home Premium: Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Professional: Windows 10 Pro

Windows 7 Ultimate: Windows 10 Pro

 

Windows 8

All editions ust be running the latest version of Windows 8 (Windows 8.1 Update) to receive the free upgrade to Windows 10 via Windows Update.

Windows Phone 8.1: Windows 10 Mobile

Windows 8.1: Windows 10 Home

Windows 8.1 Pro: Windows 10 Pro

Windows 8.1 Pro for Students: Windows 10 Pro

With there being just two editions of Windows 10, all existing Windows editions will upgrade to either Windows 10 Home or Pro. Without the free upgrade Windows 10 Home would set users back $119, while Windows 10 Pro would set them back a cool $199. Unfortunately for people who use Windows 7 Ultimate, they will receive something of a downgrade when they move to Windows 10 Pro, due to there not being a Windows 10 Ultimate Edition. However, Microsoft hasn’t yet revealed what the ins-and-outs of the Windows 10 Pro package will be, so it may stand to offer a similar service to Windows 7 Ultimate.

Windows 10 will be released on July 29th, with it making its way to the PC first before moving onto other hardware such as the Windows Phone and the Xbox One.